Art by William W Hoyt

Biography


William Hoyt was born in Houston near the Texas Gulf Coast. He spent a lot of time growing up on the coast, the sea and the weather always had a strong influence on him.

 

 

 

One of Hoyt's first canvases was the white cardboard that the cleaners use to insert in his dads folded white shirts to hold there shape. Bill's father was a vice president of a large advertising company with a large inhouse art department. One of the artist, Mark Storm, was always giving Bill tips and lessons in drawing. Mark was the western artist who illustrated the famous "Texas Braggs" books.

 

 

 

Hoyt studied art in high school and won several top awards in district wide competition. Another accomplishment for Bill in high school was he met the love of his life, Sandy. The way Bill describes it, he walked into the library after cutting algebra, which he hated. There before him was a beautiful petite blonde at the card catalogue, in a pink and black dress with many petticoats, white bobby socks and black suede penny loafers. As Hoyt describes it the clouds parted the sun shone on Sandy illuminating her pale blonde hair and a chorus of angels sang. He was lost. They were fifteen at the time and six children and 60 years later they are still joined at the hip.

 

 

 

Bill is a veteran of the U.S. Coast Guard, he served for six years. He graduated from The University of Dallas, where he majored in Fine Art.

 

 

 

While in his thirties Bill was Vice President of Sales and Marketing for a box chocolate manufacturer. In his capacity as head of marketing he designed new packaging, some of which had his own art work featured on the boxes.

 

 

 

Hoyt moved back to Dallas in his forties, where he opened two frame shops and art galleries in the Dallas metro area. Later he added a third one in the Texas Hill Country. In 1998 he turned over the business to his second oldest son, Brian.

 

 

 

Bill has shown his work over the years locally picking up several awards in the process. His favorite which wasn't really an award, was when he was able to have a painting hang in a show at the Dallas Museum of Art. The night they were hanging the show before the opening, one of the Museum Patrons called and bought his painting over the phone. She is the wife of a famous custom jeweler.

 

 

 

Bill no longer competes in shows but, paints full time to satisfy his customers and

 

galleries.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

William Hoyt was born in Houston near the Texas Gulf Coast. He spent a lot of time growing up on the coast, the sea and the weather always had a strong influence on him.

 

One of Hoyt's first canvases was the white cardboard that the cleaners use to insert in his dads folded white shirts to hold there shape. Bill's father was a vice president of a large advertising company with a large inhouse art department. One of the artist, Mark Storm, was always giving Bill tips and lessons in drawing. Mark was the western artist who illustrated the famous "Texas Braggs" books.

 

Hoyt studied art in high school and won several top awards in district wide competition. Another accomplishment for Bill in high school was he met the love of his life, Sandy. The way Bill describes it, he walked into the library after cutting algebra, which he hated. There before him was a beautiful petite blonde at the card catalogue, in a pink and black dress with many petticoats, white bobby socks and black suede penny loafers. As Hoyt describes it the clouds parted the sun shone on Sandy illuminating her pale blonde hair and a chorus of angels sang. He was lost. They were fifteen at the time and six children and 60 years later they are still joined at the hip.

 

Bill is a veteran of the U.S. Coast Guard, he served for six years. He graduated from The University of Dallas, where he majored in Fine Art.

 

While in his thirties Bill was Vice President of Sales and Marketing for a box chocolate manufacturer. In his capacity as head of marketing he designed new packaging, some of which had his own art work featured on the boxes.

 

Hoyt moved back to Dallas in his forties, where he opened two frame shops and art galleries in the Dallas metro area. Later he added a third one in the Texas Hill Country. In 1998 he turned over the business to his second oldest son, Brian.

 

Bill has shown his work over the years locally picking up several awards in the process. His favorite which wasn't really an award, was when he was able to have a painting hang in a show at the Dallas Museum of Art. The night they were hanging the show before the opening, one of the Museum Patrons called and bought his painting over the phone. She is the wife of a famous custom jeweler.

 

Bill no longer competes in shows but, paints full time to satisfy his customers and

galleries.

 

 

 

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